Flying with Birds and Bats

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BirdNote®

Flying with Birds and Bats

Written by Bob Sundstrom

That is BirdNote.

[Nature SFX 045 Forest Morning Songbirds]

Within the lengthy historical past of life on earth, vertebrates advanced powered flight simply 3 times. Amongst reptiles, the now-extinct pterosaurs. Amongst mammals, the bats. And – in fact – birds.

Bats and birds have advanced very alternative ways of flying. This begins with wing construction. A chicken just like the Pink-tailed Hawk, for instance, has stiff feathers projecting again from light-weight, fused arm and hand bones. The Huge Brown Bats, discovered attempting to find bugs above many neighborhoods, have versatile wings of membranes stretched between elongated fingers.

[Bat sounds, https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=W3Uuv_0ihdk]

Whereas the hawk makes use of the highly effective downstroke of its wings to fly, the bat helps its weight on the upstroke as properly, by twisting its wings backward.

[Bat sounds, https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=ppLsu5Z2Np0]

Bats seem to row by the air, flexing their wings like we use our arms to swim. They will fold their wings into totally different shapes to alter path out of the blue to catch flying bugs.

Though their agility in flight is not any match for a bat’s, many birds fly with a lot larger velocity. The hawk can flex its wings into a good aerodynamic form to swoop down on prey.

    [Red-tailed Hawk call, ML 47538, 0:04-0:06]

Each of those extremely advanced teams of vertebrates have been very profitable, and collectively show there’s a couple of approach to fly.

[Bat sounds, https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=ppLsu5Z2Np0]

For BirdNote, I’m Ariana Remmel.

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Senior Producer: John Kessler
Content material Director: Allison Wilson
Producer: Mark Bramhill
Affiliate Producer: Ellen Blackstone
Managing Producer: Conor Gearin
Bird sounds supplied by The Macaulay Library of Pure Sounds on the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, New York. Pink-tailed Hawk ML 47538 recorded by D. Herr.
BirdNote’s theme was composed and performed by Nancy Rumbel and John Kessler.
© 2022 BirdNote    February 2022       Narrator: Ariana Remmel

ID# bats-05-2022-02-23    bats-05

References
https://www.researchgate.internet/profile/L-Johansson/publication/6337140_Ba…
https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fphys.2020.01038/full 
https://smallscience.hbcse.tifr.res.in/how-bats-fly/
https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.livescience.com/amp/1245-bats-efficien…
 

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